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Why Foreign Language?

February 8, 2013

How important is a foreign language?

I don’t know about you, but I’m not one of those people who naturally picks up foreign languages.  I did learn some Latin along with my kids, but I had to study really hard to stay ahead of them, and eventually I realized that they were passing me up no matter how hard I tried!  I don’t feel too bad, though, because there are a lot of adults who don’t know a foreign language.  But what about high school kids who want to go to college?  Don’t they need a foreign language to get in?  Well, it turns out that a lot of students are admitted to college without knowing a foreign language.  In fact, some colleges don’t have any language requirement at all, although there are others who insist on foreign language study before they grant a degree.

I think that foreign language study can serve several important purposes.

First, it’s a wonderful way to learn about English grammar.  If you study a foreign language in your homeschool, it will increase your child’s knowledge of the English language.  It will also help them understand the differences between languages – for example, some languages use articles (the, a, an) and others don’t.

Second, learning a foreign language is great for critical thinking.  There are some colleges that use foreign language competency to see how well your child studies and learns.  They figure that if your child has the study skills necessary for a foreign language, they’ll probably do well in college.  In other words, they just like to see kids work hard.

Third, not all countries speak English.  In fact, one of the biggest complaints you hear about Americans is that they think everyone DOES speak English.  One of the reasons for this “rude American” stereotype is the people who insist on speaking only English when they go to a non-English speaking country.  If you want to interact with people in another country, whether as a guest or a missionary, speaking the language is considered the polite thing to do.  Even if you just attempt to speak their language, it can make all the difference.

There are a lot of foreign languages to choose from!  American Sign Language is accepted at some universities, and it’s a great language for kinesthetic learners.  Latin is accepted almost everywhere, and can be a great fit for a logical, mathematical, or non-linguistic child.  There are many ways to fit this subject into your homeschool coursework, and make it a part of your child’s high school experience. Try to make it fun!

If you need any extra help, you will really appreciate my Gold Care Club, full of templates and tools to help you homeschool high school.

2 Comments »

  1. Ellen Joslin says:

    One fun way my girls learned a foreign language was to tie it to their planned college major which is Nursing. We found a course entitled “Spanish for Healthcare Workers” put out by the University of Arizona. This course really kept their interest. Although language wasn’t required for their major, it gave them a new “tool” to use in their intended career.

    June 14th, 2014 at 7:19 pm

  2. Assistant to The HomeScholar says:

    That’s brilliant Ellen!

    I think I will have my future Midwife check that course out!

    Robin
    Assistant to The HomeScholar

    June 20th, 2014 at 9:51 am

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